Start Date

29-11-2007 12:00 AM

Description

Large-scale hog (Sus scroja) production is a major agricultural enterprise in the Midwest. Large numbers of confined hogs produce about 50 million tons per year of swine manure in Iowa alone. Rapid expansion of concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) has resulted in increased concentrations of manure nutrients in surface waters which contribute about 15% of the total nitrate load in the Mississippi River Basin. Producers are being encouraged to develop manure management practices that fulfill crop production requirements, while minimizing the potential for environmental pollution. The most commonly used manure management practice in the Midwest involves fall application to land where corn (Zea mays L.) will be grown in the subsequent growing season. Fall planted annual cover crops can capture manure nutrients and immobilize them in plant biomass, subsequently reducing the potential for nutrient loss through run-off or leaching. Decomposition of cover crop residue the following spring may help synchronize manure N availability and corn N uptake, improving nutrient-use efficiency within the crop rotation.

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Nov 29th, 12:00 AM

Coupling Manure Injection with Cover Crops to Enhance Nutrient Cycling

Large-scale hog (Sus scroja) production is a major agricultural enterprise in the Midwest. Large numbers of confined hogs produce about 50 million tons per year of swine manure in Iowa alone. Rapid expansion of concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) has resulted in increased concentrations of manure nutrients in surface waters which contribute about 15% of the total nitrate load in the Mississippi River Basin. Producers are being encouraged to develop manure management practices that fulfill crop production requirements, while minimizing the potential for environmental pollution. The most commonly used manure management practice in the Midwest involves fall application to land where corn (Zea mays L.) will be grown in the subsequent growing season. Fall planted annual cover crops can capture manure nutrients and immobilize them in plant biomass, subsequently reducing the potential for nutrient loss through run-off or leaching. Decomposition of cover crop residue the following spring may help synchronize manure N availability and corn N uptake, improving nutrient-use efficiency within the crop rotation.

 

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