Presenter Information

Joe Lauer, University of Wisconsin

Start Date

11-12-2008 12:00 AM

Description

Sustainable agriculture is a practice that over the long term enhances environmental quality and the resource base on which agriculture depends, provides for basic human food and fiber needs, is economically viable, and improves the quality of life for farmers and society (White et al. , 1994). Crop rotation is a universal management practice that has been recognized and exploited for centuries and is a proven process that increases crop yields. Many reports involving tillage type, N fertilizer rate, and inclusion of a legume show yield benefit of 4 to 22% for rotated corn over continuous corn (Raimbault and Vyn, 1991; Peterson and Varvel, 1989b; Katsvairo and Cox, 2000a; b) . The key benefits of including a forage or pasture crop consist of increasing soil N levels increase carbon retention in the surface horizon and a more even distribution of labor needs and risk due to climate or market conditions than those involving only grain or fiber crops (Peterson and Varvel, 1989a; Raimbault and Vyn, 199; Magdoff and vanEs, 2000). Extended rotations involving forage crops may be more sustainable than current short-term agricultural practices (Randall, 2003).

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/icm-180809-913

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Dec 11th, 12:00 AM

For Crops … its Rotation, Rotation, Rotation! The Sustainability of the Corn-Soybean Rotation

Sustainable agriculture is a practice that over the long term enhances environmental quality and the resource base on which agriculture depends, provides for basic human food and fiber needs, is economically viable, and improves the quality of life for farmers and society (White et al. , 1994). Crop rotation is a universal management practice that has been recognized and exploited for centuries and is a proven process that increases crop yields. Many reports involving tillage type, N fertilizer rate, and inclusion of a legume show yield benefit of 4 to 22% for rotated corn over continuous corn (Raimbault and Vyn, 1991; Peterson and Varvel, 1989b; Katsvairo and Cox, 2000a; b) . The key benefits of including a forage or pasture crop consist of increasing soil N levels increase carbon retention in the surface horizon and a more even distribution of labor needs and risk due to climate or market conditions than those involving only grain or fiber crops (Peterson and Varvel, 1989a; Raimbault and Vyn, 199; Magdoff and vanEs, 2000). Extended rotations involving forage crops may be more sustainable than current short-term agricultural practices (Randall, 2003).

 

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