Start Date

1-12-2009 12:00 AM

Description

The cool 2009 growing season resulted in a challenging disease management year for soybean growers. The long wet planting season followed by a record cool July was ideal for disease occurrence. It was the first time that two soybean diseases, sudden death syndrome (SDS) and soybean white mold, were wide spread in the same season in Iowa, as well other states. In August, SDS showed up almost in every area in Iowa with some regions having high intensity. Large patches of soybean with SDS symptom were obvious from south to north. Into late August, white mold gained attention as producers knew from their previous harvest experience that this disease affects yield. This year white mold was so wide spread that agronomists in southern Iowa reported the observations of this disease in many soybean fields. In northern Iowa, patches of soybean killed by this disease were so obvious that I found them in nearly every soybean field while attending a field day. Prior to 2009, the highest loss from white mold in my memory was about $32,000 for a farm. This year, a farmer told me he estimated a loss of $40,000 by this disease from his farm.

Share

COinS
 
Dec 1st, 12:00 AM

Managing soybean sudden death syndrome and white mold

The cool 2009 growing season resulted in a challenging disease management year for soybean growers. The long wet planting season followed by a record cool July was ideal for disease occurrence. It was the first time that two soybean diseases, sudden death syndrome (SDS) and soybean white mold, were wide spread in the same season in Iowa, as well other states. In August, SDS showed up almost in every area in Iowa with some regions having high intensity. Large patches of soybean with SDS symptom were obvious from south to north. Into late August, white mold gained attention as producers knew from their previous harvest experience that this disease affects yield. This year white mold was so wide spread that agronomists in southern Iowa reported the observations of this disease in many soybean fields. In northern Iowa, patches of soybean killed by this disease were so obvious that I found them in nearly every soybean field while attending a field day. Prior to 2009, the highest loss from white mold in my memory was about $32,000 for a farm. This year, a farmer told me he estimated a loss of $40,000 by this disease from his farm.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.