Start Date

28-11-2012 12:00 AM

Description

The ‘drought of 2012’ actually started impacting Iowa crops as early as August of 2011. Ominous-looking, animated maps showed the extent and slow, creeping spread of extremely dry conditions across Iowa and the Corn Belt during the fall of 2011 and the 2011/2012 winter. Spring rains were not sufficient to recharge soil moisture. Corn planting proceeded ahead of normal. Although much of the corn ended up in what some considered ‘perfect’ seed beds, sidewall compaction and other early-season problems handicapped emergence and early-season growth. Warm temperatures (especially high-night temperatures) resulted in rapid progression through crop growth stages. Dry conditions aggravated the situation. The crop silked well ahead of normal. That trend continued through the reproductive period resulting in an early harvest. As a result of the early harvest we had drier grain and reduced drying costs.

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Nov 28th, 12:00 AM

Corn management: Understanding yield and the impact of growth variability on yield

The ‘drought of 2012’ actually started impacting Iowa crops as early as August of 2011. Ominous-looking, animated maps showed the extent and slow, creeping spread of extremely dry conditions across Iowa and the Corn Belt during the fall of 2011 and the 2011/2012 winter. Spring rains were not sufficient to recharge soil moisture. Corn planting proceeded ahead of normal. Although much of the corn ended up in what some considered ‘perfect’ seed beds, sidewall compaction and other early-season problems handicapped emergence and early-season growth. Warm temperatures (especially high-night temperatures) resulted in rapid progression through crop growth stages. Dry conditions aggravated the situation. The crop silked well ahead of normal. That trend continued through the reproductive period resulting in an early harvest. As a result of the early harvest we had drier grain and reduced drying costs.