Start Date

1-12-2015 12:00 AM

Description

Farmers have adopted biotechnology and genetically engineered (GE) crop technologies quickly. Yield data were analyzed from field experiments over the period 1990-2010 to test the hypothesis that GE corn technologies reduces production risk. GE technology can increase yield, but it also decreases yield for some GE traits. A significant part of the benefits of GE technology comes from protecting corn yield and reducing risk exposure. Gene interactions affect corn productivity through “yield lag” and “yield drag” effects. Often 3 to 4 years are required for new technologies to be equivalent to yields of conventional hybrids.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.31274/icm-180809-165

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Dec 1st, 12:00 AM

Selecting corn hybrids in the transgenic era

Farmers have adopted biotechnology and genetically engineered (GE) crop technologies quickly. Yield data were analyzed from field experiments over the period 1990-2010 to test the hypothesis that GE corn technologies reduces production risk. GE technology can increase yield, but it also decreases yield for some GE traits. A significant part of the benefits of GE technology comes from protecting corn yield and reducing risk exposure. Gene interactions affect corn productivity through “yield lag” and “yield drag” effects. Often 3 to 4 years are required for new technologies to be equivalent to yields of conventional hybrids.

 

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