Start Date

1-12-2016 12:00 AM

Description

It has been approximately 30 years since the last new herbicide mechanism of action (MOA) was introduced and it is unlikely that a new MOA will be introduced in the near future. Furthermore, weed management issues continue to escalate, particularly the increasing number of herbicide-resistant weed populations and the increasing population densities in fields with herbicide-resistant weeds. For example, in Iowa, multiple resistance in waterhemp is the norm rather than the exception and the rate of spread is accelerating. The recent wide spread introduction of Palmer amaranth in Iowa further contributes to future weed problems. Regardless, farmers in Iowa remain “techno-optimistic” that new herbicide solutions to the weed management problems will be soon introduced (Dentzman et al. 2016). This “techno-optimism” is contrasted by the “techno-skepticism” of farmers in the south. Interestingly, Iowa farmers also express concerns that new resistances in weeds are inevitable with the anticipated new herbicides but that the future new herbicides are essentially the only option for effective weed control. A number of current and future issues will be considered and perspectives provided in this paper.

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Dec 1st, 12:00 AM

Weed management for 2017 and beyond

It has been approximately 30 years since the last new herbicide mechanism of action (MOA) was introduced and it is unlikely that a new MOA will be introduced in the near future. Furthermore, weed management issues continue to escalate, particularly the increasing number of herbicide-resistant weed populations and the increasing population densities in fields with herbicide-resistant weeds. For example, in Iowa, multiple resistance in waterhemp is the norm rather than the exception and the rate of spread is accelerating. The recent wide spread introduction of Palmer amaranth in Iowa further contributes to future weed problems. Regardless, farmers in Iowa remain “techno-optimistic” that new herbicide solutions to the weed management problems will be soon introduced (Dentzman et al. 2016). This “techno-optimism” is contrasted by the “techno-skepticism” of farmers in the south. Interestingly, Iowa farmers also express concerns that new resistances in weeds are inevitable with the anticipated new herbicides but that the future new herbicides are essentially the only option for effective weed control. A number of current and future issues will be considered and perspectives provided in this paper.