Start Date

1-12-2017 12:00 AM

Description

Cover crops have numerous environmental benefits, for example reducing erosion, improving infiltration, mitigating nutrient loading in surface waters, and improving soil health (Kaspar et al 2001, Kaspar and Singer 2011, Schnepf and Cox 2006). Still, some farmers are reluctant to introduce cover crops into their production systems. In a 2016 Cover Crop Survey, approximately 30 percent of the respondents stated that “increased disease potential” was a minor or major challenge to using cover crops on their farm (SARE, 2016). Of the respondents, 20 percent had been growing cover crops for 2-3 years, 30% for 4-5 years, and 19% for more than 10 years. The goal of our research is to understand how cover crop may affect disease potential in the following cash crop and thereby recommend actions that may be taken to mitigate disease risk.

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Dec 1st, 12:00 AM

Disease risks associated with cover crops and soybean production

Cover crops have numerous environmental benefits, for example reducing erosion, improving infiltration, mitigating nutrient loading in surface waters, and improving soil health (Kaspar et al 2001, Kaspar and Singer 2011, Schnepf and Cox 2006). Still, some farmers are reluctant to introduce cover crops into their production systems. In a 2016 Cover Crop Survey, approximately 30 percent of the respondents stated that “increased disease potential” was a minor or major challenge to using cover crops on their farm (SARE, 2016). Of the respondents, 20 percent had been growing cover crops for 2-3 years, 30% for 4-5 years, and 19% for more than 10 years. The goal of our research is to understand how cover crop may affect disease potential in the following cash crop and thereby recommend actions that may be taken to mitigate disease risk.