Presenter Information

Peter Goldsbrough, Purdue University

Start Date

1-12-2017 12:00 AM

Description

The first transgenic plants were produced in 1983 by three different groups of scientists in the United States and Europe. The successful transfer of genes from other species into petunia and tobacco plants was a major technological achievement that led to important advances in our understanding of how plants grow and develop. This technology also led to the development of genetically modified (GM) agronomic crop plants that were planted by farmers for the first time in 1996. This technology has generated more controversy than any other advance in agriculture in the last twenty years. Further scientific advances made during the last two decades are being applied to plant breeding and crop agriculture. These include genome sequencing, the discovery of RNA interference, and revelations about the microbial communities that live on plants and in the soil. Surpassing all of these, however, are new gene editing technologies that have been developed in the last few years. These provide new approaches for genetic modification that have even more potential than transgenic methods to modify crop plants.

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Dec 1st, 12:00 AM

Genetically modified crops: Marvel or malady?

The first transgenic plants were produced in 1983 by three different groups of scientists in the United States and Europe. The successful transfer of genes from other species into petunia and tobacco plants was a major technological achievement that led to important advances in our understanding of how plants grow and develop. This technology also led to the development of genetically modified (GM) agronomic crop plants that were planted by farmers for the first time in 1996. This technology has generated more controversy than any other advance in agriculture in the last twenty years. Further scientific advances made during the last two decades are being applied to plant breeding and crop agriculture. These include genome sequencing, the discovery of RNA interference, and revelations about the microbial communities that live on plants and in the soil. Surpassing all of these, however, are new gene editing technologies that have been developed in the last few years. These provide new approaches for genetic modification that have even more potential than transgenic methods to modify crop plants.

 

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