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CB

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Event

Description

The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the underlying psychological process by which limited edition marketing of fashion goods impacts consumers' attitudes and behavioral intentions. An online experiment was conducted using Amazon Mechanical Turk. Fictitious scenarios reflecting two different levels of perceived competition (high and low) were carefully developed from pretest. Also, two different fashion products (sneakers and fast-fashion brand jackets designed by high-fashion designers) that are known to use limited-edition strategy frequently were used in the scenario. To test the hypotheses, t-test, simple regression and hierarchical regression analyses were conducted. While the perceived competition increased the perceived popularity (β=.710, p<.05), the perceived competition had no influence on the perceived inequity (β=.103, p=.25). As predicted, the perceived popularity positively influenced the attitude (β=.469, p<.05), while the perceived inequity negatively influenced the attitude (β=.-439, p<.05). The attitude positively influenced the behavioral intentions (β=.706, p<.05).

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Nov 9th, 12:00 AM

The Double-edge Sword of Limited Edition Fashion Marketing

The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the underlying psychological process by which limited edition marketing of fashion goods impacts consumers' attitudes and behavioral intentions. An online experiment was conducted using Amazon Mechanical Turk. Fictitious scenarios reflecting two different levels of perceived competition (high and low) were carefully developed from pretest. Also, two different fashion products (sneakers and fast-fashion brand jackets designed by high-fashion designers) that are known to use limited-edition strategy frequently were used in the scenario. To test the hypotheses, t-test, simple regression and hierarchical regression analyses were conducted. While the perceived competition increased the perceived popularity (β=.710, p<.05), the perceived competition had no influence on the perceived inequity (β=.103, p=.25). As predicted, the perceived popularity positively influenced the attitude (β=.469, p<.05), while the perceived inequity negatively influenced the attitude (β=.-439, p<.05). The attitude positively influenced the behavioral intentions (β=.706, p<.05).

 

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