Track

PPD

Presentation Type

Event

Description

Boden (2004) explained that one way to be creative is to make “unfamiliar combinations of familiar ideas'(p. 2). One familiar concept at a public institution set in an urban environment in the United States is social justice. The goal of this teaching technique was to engage students with social justice issues throughout the design process in an apparel design studio setting. This project was designed to infuse and encourage engagement with an important topic in a non-traditional fashion. The instructor defined social justice and equity, and then provided several examples of inequalities present in our society. Students were required to identify a social injustice and research the topic by examining news, journals, or other outlets. Students were encouraged to utilize visual representation in the design or utilize emotions associated with the injustice in the construction and elements throughout the design process and execution. Students utilized a variety of social justice inspiration sources such as racial inequity, sexism, colorism, classism, and abelism. During presentations, students exhibited strong emotion and connection to their results.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 9th, 12:00 AM

Exploring Social Justice Issues Through Design in an Apparel Design Studio Course

Boden (2004) explained that one way to be creative is to make “unfamiliar combinations of familiar ideas'(p. 2). One familiar concept at a public institution set in an urban environment in the United States is social justice. The goal of this teaching technique was to engage students with social justice issues throughout the design process in an apparel design studio setting. This project was designed to infuse and encourage engagement with an important topic in a non-traditional fashion. The instructor defined social justice and equity, and then provided several examples of inequalities present in our society. Students were required to identify a social injustice and research the topic by examining news, journals, or other outlets. Students were encouraged to utilize visual representation in the design or utilize emotions associated with the injustice in the construction and elements throughout the design process and execution. Students utilized a variety of social justice inspiration sources such as racial inequity, sexism, colorism, classism, and abelism. During presentations, students exhibited strong emotion and connection to their results.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.