Track

SPA

Presentation Type

Event

Description

Using person perception theory, the SOR model, and grounded theory as a guide, men and women who have been victimized were interviewed to identify the connection they perceived between the experience and appearance and the consequences thereof. Incidents of victimization included disapproving looks, shunning, bullying, unwanted touching, and physical assault. All of the participants tied experiences of victimization to aspects of their appearance including both body-related features (e.g., baldness, skin color, attractiveness, height) and dress (e.g., tattoos, wearing indigenous clothing, wearing Goth clothing). Participants believe appearance placed a significant role in victimization and resulted in negative personal consequences (e.g., lowered self-esteem) as well as positive consequences (e.g., wanting to help others who have been victimized), and ripple effects on the community at large. In-group/out-group victimization was based on (perceived) ethnicity or cultural affiliation and men experienced victimization but did not talk about it with others. Future research is discussed.

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Nov 8th, 12:00 AM

Dress, Body, and Experiences of Victimization

Using person perception theory, the SOR model, and grounded theory as a guide, men and women who have been victimized were interviewed to identify the connection they perceived between the experience and appearance and the consequences thereof. Incidents of victimization included disapproving looks, shunning, bullying, unwanted touching, and physical assault. All of the participants tied experiences of victimization to aspects of their appearance including both body-related features (e.g., baldness, skin color, attractiveness, height) and dress (e.g., tattoos, wearing indigenous clothing, wearing Goth clothing). Participants believe appearance placed a significant role in victimization and resulted in negative personal consequences (e.g., lowered self-esteem) as well as positive consequences (e.g., wanting to help others who have been victimized), and ripple effects on the community at large. In-group/out-group victimization was based on (perceived) ethnicity or cultural affiliation and men experienced victimization but did not talk about it with others. Future research is discussed.

 

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