Track

CB

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Description

Individuals often consume products as a means of expressing themselves to those they interact with. Previous studies demonstrate that consumers use branded products to enhance their self-identity, highlight individuality, and increase social approval. (Geiger-Oneto et al., 2013), which is evident particularly in luxury consumption behavior (Vigneron & Johnson, 1999). As previous studies focused on examining predictors of luxury purchase intention (e.g., Bian & Forsythe, 2012), this study is interested in how consumers' post-purchase emotions influence their intention of re-purchasing a luxury counterfeit. In addition, this study proposes that the effects of goal incongruence on aroused emotions are contingent upon the agent who causes the emotions (i.e., self, others) This study adopts emotion theory and appraisal theories as conceptual framework to examine a study phenomenon of interest. Our findings demonstrated that different post-consumption emotions are generated differently depending on the causation agent. Results, discussion and implications are presented.

Share

COinS
 
Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Does This Bag Make Me Look Good? The Impact of Post-Consumption Emotions on Re-Purchase Intention of Counterfeit Luxury Products

Individuals often consume products as a means of expressing themselves to those they interact with. Previous studies demonstrate that consumers use branded products to enhance their self-identity, highlight individuality, and increase social approval. (Geiger-Oneto et al., 2013), which is evident particularly in luxury consumption behavior (Vigneron & Johnson, 1999). As previous studies focused on examining predictors of luxury purchase intention (e.g., Bian & Forsythe, 2012), this study is interested in how consumers' post-purchase emotions influence their intention of re-purchasing a luxury counterfeit. In addition, this study proposes that the effects of goal incongruence on aroused emotions are contingent upon the agent who causes the emotions (i.e., self, others) This study adopts emotion theory and appraisal theories as conceptual framework to examine a study phenomenon of interest. Our findings demonstrated that different post-consumption emotions are generated differently depending on the causation agent. Results, discussion and implications are presented.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.