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Two marigold dye solutions, fresh and preserved, were compared for dyeing silk and linen fabric that could be replicated by artisans. Two commercial detergents, Tide Free and Woolite, were evaluated to provide a home washing recommendation. Samples were dyed at 10% on the weight of fiber and exposed to colorfastness to home laundering (American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists, AATCC Monograph 6-2016) with both detergents. Color strength and color change CIEL*a*b* values were accessed according to AATCC grayscale. The preserved marigold treatment had significantly (p < 0.05) darker and warmer color strength on both fabrics. Color change, staining from exposure to home laundering was not significantly different between dye solutions, nor between detergents. The study findings do not support home laundering for marigold dyed samples as samples failed to meet ASTM standard for color change, regardless of treatments. Future work should evaluate these treatments against hand laundering conditions.

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Investigating Marigolds as a Dyestuff for a Small Business: Extraction, Colorfastness, and Care of Silk and Linen

Two marigold dye solutions, fresh and preserved, were compared for dyeing silk and linen fabric that could be replicated by artisans. Two commercial detergents, Tide Free and Woolite, were evaluated to provide a home washing recommendation. Samples were dyed at 10% on the weight of fiber and exposed to colorfastness to home laundering (American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists, AATCC Monograph 6-2016) with both detergents. Color strength and color change CIEL*a*b* values were accessed according to AATCC grayscale. The preserved marigold treatment had significantly (p < 0.05) darker and warmer color strength on both fabrics. Color change, staining from exposure to home laundering was not significantly different between dye solutions, nor between detergents. The study findings do not support home laundering for marigold dyed samples as samples failed to meet ASTM standard for color change, regardless of treatments. Future work should evaluate these treatments against hand laundering conditions.

 

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