Track

CUL

Presentation Type

Poster

Description

This study expands brand equity research by examining the moderating effects of culture and identity expressiveness and lovemarks in building global brand equity. A total of 711 responses (362 for the US and 349 for the Chinese sample) completed an online survey. The moderating effects were confirmed by a chi-square difference test. For US consumers, all three associations increased lovemarks, with cognitive associations producing the strongest positive impact. For Chinese consumers, affective associations had the strongest effect, while the effects of sensory associations were insignificant. In both groups, the impact of cognitive associations on lovemarks was stronger for those with high levels of identity expressiveness, whereas the impact of affective associations was stronger for those with low levels of identity expressiveness. The impact of sensory associations on lovemarks was significant in the US sample, whereas no impact from sensory associations was found in the Chinses sample. The anticipated pathways from lovemarks to loyalty and WOM were positive and significant. These findings provide theoretical and managerial implications for local and global brand managers.

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

The Moderating Role of Identity Expressiveness in Building Global Brand Equity

This study expands brand equity research by examining the moderating effects of culture and identity expressiveness and lovemarks in building global brand equity. A total of 711 responses (362 for the US and 349 for the Chinese sample) completed an online survey. The moderating effects were confirmed by a chi-square difference test. For US consumers, all three associations increased lovemarks, with cognitive associations producing the strongest positive impact. For Chinese consumers, affective associations had the strongest effect, while the effects of sensory associations were insignificant. In both groups, the impact of cognitive associations on lovemarks was stronger for those with high levels of identity expressiveness, whereas the impact of affective associations was stronger for those with low levels of identity expressiveness. The impact of sensory associations on lovemarks was significant in the US sample, whereas no impact from sensory associations was found in the Chinses sample. The anticipated pathways from lovemarks to loyalty and WOM were positive and significant. These findings provide theoretical and managerial implications for local and global brand managers.

 

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