Campus Units

Kinesiology

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Accepted Manuscript

Publication Date

7-2018

Journal or Book Title

Gait & Posture

Volume

64

First Page

213

Last Page

219

DOI

10.1016/j.gaitpost.2018.06.113

Abstract

Background

Individuals often carry items in one hand instead of both hands during activities of daily living. Research Question The purpose of this study was to investigate low back and lower extremity frontal plane moments for loaded limb stance and unloaded limb stance when carrying symmetric and asymmetric loads during stair negotiation.

Methods

Participants were instructed to ascend and descend a three-step staircase at preferred pace using a right leg lead and a left leg lead for each load condition: no load, 20% body weight (BW) bilateral load, and 20% BW unilateral load. L5/S1 contralateral bending, hip abduction, external knee varus, and ankle inversion moments were calculated using inverse dynamics.

Results

Peak L5/S1 contralateral bending moments were significantly higher when carrying a 20% BW unilateral load as compared to a 20% BW bilateral load for both stair ascent and stair descent. In addition, peak L5/S1 contralateral bending moments were significantly higher during step one than for step two. Peak external knee varus and hip abduction moments were significantly higher in unloaded limb stance as compared to loaded limb stance when carrying a 20% BW unilateral load.

Significance

General load carriage recommendations include carrying less than 20% BW loads and splitting loads bilaterally when feasible. Assessment recommendations include analyzing the first stair step and analyzing both the loaded and unloaded limbs.

Comments

This is a manuscript of an article published as Wang, Junsig, and Jason C. Gillette. "Carrying asymmetric loads during stair negotiation: Loaded limb stance vs. unloaded limb stance." Gait & Posture 64 (2018): 213-219. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2018.06.113. Posted with permission.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Copyright Owner

Elsevier B.V.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Available for download on Monday, July 01, 2019

Published Version

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