Campus Units

Kinesiology

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2-17-2017

Journal or Book Title

Brain and Behavior

Volume

7

Issue

3

First Page

e00625

DOI

10.1002/brb3.625

Abstract

Introduction: Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) has been shown to be related to brain health in older adults. In individuals at risk for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), CRF may be a modifiable risk factor that could attenuate anticipated declines in brain volume and episodic memory. The objective of this study was to determine the association between CRF and both hippocampal volume and episodic memory in a cohort of cognitively healthy older adults with familial and/or genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Methods: Eighty‐six enrollees from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention participated in this study. Participants performed a graded maximal exercise test, underwent a T‐1 anatomical magnetic resonance imaging scan, and completed the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT).

Results: There were no significant relationships between CRF and HV or RAVLT memory scores for the entire sample. When the sample was explored on the basis of gender, CRF was significantly associated with hippocampal volume for women. For men, significant positive associations were observed between CRF and RAVLT memory scores.

Summary: These results suggest that CRF may be protective against both hippocampal volume and episodic memory decline in older adults at risk for AD, but that the relationships may be gender specific.

Comments

This article is published as 8. Dougherty R, Schultz S, Boots E, Ellingson L, Meyer J, Van Riper S, Stegner A Edwards D, Oh J, Einerson J, Korcarz C, Koscik R, Dowling M, Gallagher C, Carlsson C, Rowley H, Bendlin B, Asthana S, Hermann B, Sager M, Stein J, Johnson S, Okwonko O, Cook D. Relationships between cardiorespiratory fitness, hippocampal volume, and episodic memory in a population at risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Brain and Behavior; 2017, 7(3); e00625. DOI: 10.1002/brb3.625.

Rights

This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA.

Copyright Owner

The Author(s)

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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