Campus Units

World Languages and Cultures

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Accepted Manuscript

Publication Date

5-2015

Journal or Book Title

The Picaresque Novel in Western Literature

Volume

Chapter 6

First Page

96

Last Page

112

Abstract

In Part 2 of Miguel de Cervantes's Don Quixote (1605), the knight and his squire happen across a prisoner chain gang headed to the royal galleys to serve out their sentences. In a rather famous exchange, Gines de Pasamonte, one of the condemned, informs Don Quixote that he is writing his own autobiography titled La vida de Gines de Pasamonte (The life of Gines de Pasamonte) that, when finished, will be so good and entertaining that it will overshadow Lazarillo de Tormes and all other works of that sort: Es tan bueno {...} que mal ano para Lazarillo de Tormes y para todos cuantos de aquel genero se han escrito o escribieren' (It's so good [...] that it's going to be bad new sfor Lazarillo de Tormes and for all the others of that genre that have been, or will be, written).

Comments

This book chapter is published as Cervantes and the Picaresque: A Question of Compatibility.” The Picaresque Novel in Western Literature: From the Sixteenth Century to the Neopicaresque. Ed. J. A. G. Ardila. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2015. Chapter 6; 96-112. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

Cambridge University Press

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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