Campus Units

World Languages and Cultures

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Accepted Manuscript

Publication Date

2010

Journal or Book Title

Quarterly Review of Film and Video

Volume

27

Issue

1

First Page

1

Last Page

13

DOI

10.1080/10509200802165283

Abstract

In the late 1950s and early 1960s, when an independent, postcolonial Tunisia emerged from under French colonial rule and began to engage in “modernized” nation-building practices, questions addressing the role of Tunisian women (and more importantly their image in this “new,” postcolonial and independent society) took precedence. Many political, artistic, and intellectual figures were concerned with how Tunisian women’s images were constructed in the public eye, in the arts, and in the media. These concerns led to a variety of reformist thoughts during this nationalist movement (and even still today), but all postulations appeared to coalesce in the perceived belief in the need to construct “modern” Tunisian women’s images into a single, unifying image of motherhood.

Comments

This article is published as Weber-Feve, S.,Housework and Dance as Counterpoints in French-Tunisian Filmmaker Raja Amari’s “Satin rouge”’ in Quarterly Review of Film and Video (2010) 27.1, 1-13. Doi: 10.1080/10509200802165283. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

Routledge Taylor & Francis Group

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Published Version

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