Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

12-1995

Journal or Book Title

Revista Hispánica Moderna

Volume

48

Issue

2

First Page

250

Last Page

264

Abstract

Schoolchildrn learn his "Ultimo Adi6s" by heart. University students, although not those of the Universidad de Santo Tomsis, are required to read his two famous novels. Citizens gather annually around his statue in Luneta Park, site of his December 30th execution. Some pray to him as to a saint, before domestic altars displaying his portrait. He is indeed the "patron-saint" of the Filipinos: 1 the apostle, martyr and patriot; "the man who," according to one biographer, "single-handedly awakened the Philippine people to national and political consciousness." 2 A precursor to Gandhi in his advocacy of Asian nationalism, Dr. Jos6 Rizal y Alonso, born in 1861, became a hero of modern Third World nationhood when he denounced the violence of Spanish colonialism in his novels Noli Me Tangere( 1887) and El Filibusterismo(1 891). For doing so, he was shot by a Spanish firing squad in 1896 at the age of 35. Together with Rizal's speeches and articles, the two novels are often credited with sparking the Philippine Revolution, which began two years after his death, in 1898, only to be cut short by the intervention of the United States, engaged at that time in its own war with Spain.

Comments

This article is from Revista Hispánica Moderna 48 (1995): 250–264. Posted with permission.

Rights

All rights reserved. Except for brief quotations used for purposes of scholarly citation, none of this work may be reproduced in any form by any means without written permission from the publisher. For information address the University of Pennsylvania Press, 3905 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-4112.

Copyright Owner

University of Pennsylvania Press

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS