Title

Kant Crisis

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2011

Journal or Book Title

Imaginations: Journal of Cross-Cultural Image Studies/Revue d’Études Interculturelles de l’Image

Volume

2

Issue

1

First Page

68

Last Page

79

Abstract

This study approaches the last days of Immanuel Kant through the lens of his contemporary biographers and other correspondents. Among the latter, Kant’s brother and, subsequently, his brother’s family provide a symptomatic reflection upon Kant’s management of his genealogy and his legacy. Yet behind this body of work is another corpus, one which embodies maternal and paternal legacies that are not readily subsumed by Oedipus or Kant’s philosophy. This work (of art) is Kant’s own body or corpus, which he painstakingly maintained and which provided a case study for his refelctions on preventive medicine in The Conflict of the Faculties.

Comments

This article is from Imaginations 2 (2011): 68–79. Posted with permission.

Rights

The copyright for each article belongs to the author and has been published in this journal under a Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution License that allows others to share for non-commercial purposes the work with an acknowledgement of the work’s authorship and initial publication in this journal. The content of this article represents the author’s original work and any third-party content, either image or text, has been included under the Fair Dealing exception in the Canadian Copyright Act, or the author has provided the required publication permissions.

Copyright Owner

William H. Carter

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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