Start Date

17-2-1999 12:00 AM

Description

David Struthers is part of a family farm operation that involves his brother, sister, and their parents. They have a 900-sow farrow to finish system with some confinement buildings, but they are converting to a hoop building system. They chose hoop buildings because of the lower cost of construction and decreased environmental impact, and the fact that the hoops work well for them.

Homer Showman started using the hoop system six years ago with three structures. He now has eight hoop buildings. He operates one confinement building as a nursery I grower facility. He chose hoop buildings for their low costilow capital outlay and lower environmental impact 36 on the community (less odor).

Richard Thompson and his son, Rex, have experienced many changes through the years. When Richard began farming in 1958, he said he caught the "enough is never enough" disease. He was always buying feeder pigs and cattle, putting in more pens, and cropping with continuous corn. All systems had high inputs! Livestock sickness was the rule, and good health the exception. Thompson used a lot of antibiotics with hogs.

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Feb 17th, 12:00 AM

Decision-making: Identifying Critical Points and Picking the System That's Right for You

David Struthers is part of a family farm operation that involves his brother, sister, and their parents. They have a 900-sow farrow to finish system with some confinement buildings, but they are converting to a hoop building system. They chose hoop buildings because of the lower cost of construction and decreased environmental impact, and the fact that the hoops work well for them.

Homer Showman started using the hoop system six years ago with three structures. He now has eight hoop buildings. He operates one confinement building as a nursery I grower facility. He chose hoop buildings for their low costilow capital outlay and lower environmental impact 36 on the community (less odor).

Richard Thompson and his son, Rex, have experienced many changes through the years. When Richard began farming in 1958, he said he caught the "enough is never enough" disease. He was always buying feeder pigs and cattle, putting in more pens, and cropping with continuous corn. All systems had high inputs! Livestock sickness was the rule, and good health the exception. Thompson used a lot of antibiotics with hogs.