Start Date

17-2-1999 12:00 AM

Description

Tom Frantzen is a farrow-to-finish swine producer from northeast Iowa. He has three 30 x 72-ft. "Cover All" hoops. He first learned about hoop house farrowing two years ago on an ISU tour, and began farrowing in hoops in March and April, 1998. Most of his hogs had been pasturefarrowed, something he has done for 25 years, then finished inside the hoop facilities. During the colder months, December and January, he farrows in a controlled temperature facility.

Jim Van Der Pol and his son Josh have a farrow-to-finish swine operation in western Minnesota where they raise a DurocBerkshire cross sold in specialty markets. They decided to use hoops to get the most return out of a low capital investment (hoops). Before they built the hoop facilities, they had decided to quit work in traditional hog confinement facilities.

Homer Showman has a wean-to-finish operation, which includes eight hooped structures and a nine-year-old grow-to-finish confinement facility. He began using hoops five years ago, when he built three 30 x 72 ft. hoops with a 16-ft. concrete pad on the south end. In the past, he had done pasture and confinement farrowing, but does not farrow pigs at the current time. His last three hooped structures were built on a concrete pad 2 ft. above the dirt pad.

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Feb 17th, 12:00 AM

Using hoops structures for early weaning and farrowing

Tom Frantzen is a farrow-to-finish swine producer from northeast Iowa. He has three 30 x 72-ft. "Cover All" hoops. He first learned about hoop house farrowing two years ago on an ISU tour, and began farrowing in hoops in March and April, 1998. Most of his hogs had been pasturefarrowed, something he has done for 25 years, then finished inside the hoop facilities. During the colder months, December and January, he farrows in a controlled temperature facility.

Jim Van Der Pol and his son Josh have a farrow-to-finish swine operation in western Minnesota where they raise a DurocBerkshire cross sold in specialty markets. They decided to use hoops to get the most return out of a low capital investment (hoops). Before they built the hoop facilities, they had decided to quit work in traditional hog confinement facilities.

Homer Showman has a wean-to-finish operation, which includes eight hooped structures and a nine-year-old grow-to-finish confinement facility. He began using hoops five years ago, when he built three 30 x 72 ft. hoops with a 16-ft. concrete pad on the south end. In the past, he had done pasture and confinement farrowing, but does not farrow pigs at the current time. His last three hooped structures were built on a concrete pad 2 ft. above the dirt pad.