Start Date

26-4-2014 8:30 AM

End Date

26-4-2014 10:00 AM

Description

Digital preservation has been described as an artisanal form of archives practice, with archivists applying “hand-crafted” metadata for item-level description. Recent publications from OCLC and NDSA challenge this paradigm by providing strategies, tactics, and standards to encourage archivists to think of electronic records at a higher level, using automated tools and aggregate description to move e-records into a space where users can access and analyze them. This panel will discuss ways that various institutions are collecting, processing, and preserving electronic records as guided by the principles of More Product, Less Process while still adhering to appropriate digital preservation standards. Panelists will discuss their efforts to build simplified or automated processes at all steps of the archival workflow, from working with records creators to ingest processes to building ad hoc preservation and access systems, including supplementing metadata with user-supplied content. By “going with the flow” of electronic records processing, archivists can have the same impact on making their electronic backlogs accessible as they have had already with MPLP on “traditional” collections

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Currently, Dan Noonan's presentation is available.

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Apr 26th, 8:30 AM Apr 26th, 10:00 AM

The DAO of Processing: Applying MPLP to Electronic Records Workflows

Digital preservation has been described as an artisanal form of archives practice, with archivists applying “hand-crafted” metadata for item-level description. Recent publications from OCLC and NDSA challenge this paradigm by providing strategies, tactics, and standards to encourage archivists to think of electronic records at a higher level, using automated tools and aggregate description to move e-records into a space where users can access and analyze them. This panel will discuss ways that various institutions are collecting, processing, and preserving electronic records as guided by the principles of More Product, Less Process while still adhering to appropriate digital preservation standards. Panelists will discuss their efforts to build simplified or automated processes at all steps of the archival workflow, from working with records creators to ingest processes to building ad hoc preservation and access systems, including supplementing metadata with user-supplied content. By “going with the flow” of electronic records processing, archivists can have the same impact on making their electronic backlogs accessible as they have had already with MPLP on “traditional” collections