Campus Units

Chemical and Biological Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, Ames Laboratory

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2016

Journal or Book Title

ACS Biomaterials Science and Engineering

Volume

2

Issue

6

First Page

946

Last Page

953

DOI

10.1021/acsbiomaterials.6b00041

Abstract

Macrophages are key players in the progression of many diseases, ranging from rheumatoid arthritis to cancer. Drug delivery systems have the potential not only to transport payloads to diseased tissue but also to influence cell behavior. Here, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (pNIPAm-co-AAc) microparticles were modified with 14 different arginine derivatives. These particles were then incubated with interleukin-4 or lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages or naïve macrophages (RAW 264.7). The phenotypic state of the macrophages was assessed by measuring arginase activity, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) secretion, and nitrite production. Partial least-squares analysis revealed material properties and descriptors that shifted the macrophage phenotype for the three cell conditions in this study. Material descriptors relating to secondary bonding were suggested to play a role in shifting phenotypes in all three macrophage culture conditions. These findings suggest that macrophage responses could be altered through drug delivery vehicles, and this method could be employed to assist in screening potential candidates.

Comments

Reprinted with permission from Dunn-Sale, Alexander J., and Kaitlin M. Bratlie. "Identifying Factors of Microparticles Modified with Arginine Derivatives That Induce Phenotypic Shifts in Macrophages." ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering 2, no. 6 (2016): 946-953, doi: 10.1021/acsbiomaterials.6b00041. Copyright 2016 American Chemical Society.

Copyright Owner

American Chemical Society

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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