Campus Units

Materials Science and Engineering, Ames Laboratory

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

8-15-2021

Journal or Book Title

Acta Materialia

Volume

215

First Page

117083

DOI

10.1016/j.actamat.2021.117083

Abstract

Materials responding vigorously to minor variations of external stimuli with negligible hysteresis could revolutionize many of the energy technologies, including refrigeration, actuation, and sensing. We report a combined experimental and theoretical study of a two-phase composite, naturally formed at the LaFe2Si stoichiometry, which exhibits a nearly anhysteretic, two-step first-order ferromagnetic-to-paramagnetic phase transformation with enhanced sensitivity to an external magnetic field. Other unusual properties include a large plateau-like positive magnetoresistance, magnetic-field-induced temperature and entropy changes occurring over a wide temperature range, and a Griffiths-like phase associated with short-range ferromagnetic clustering in the paramagnetic state. The heat capacity, magnetization, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and electrical resistivity, all exhibit characteristic, unusually sharp, first-order discontinuities even in magnetic fields as high as 100 kOe. We expect that similar phenomena could be designed in other mixed-phase systems, leading to novel functionalities, such as giant caloric effects in many yet undiscovered or/and underperforming intermetallic compounds.

Comments

This article is published as Pathak, Arjun K., Yaroslav Mudryk, Nikolai A. Zarkevich, Dominic H. Ryan, Duane D. Johnson, and Vitalij K. Pecharsky. "Extraordinarily strong magneto-responsiveness in phase-separated LaFe2Si." Acta Materialia (2021): 117083. DOI: 10.1016/j.actamat.2021.117083.

Rights

Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Included in

Metallurgy Commons

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