Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Conference

National Conference on Mitigating Air Emissions from Animal Feeding Operations: Exploring the Advantages, Limitations, and Economics of Mitigation Technologies

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

5-2008

Journal or Book Title

Mitigating Air Emissions from Animal Feeding Operations: Conference Proceedings

First Page

30

Last Page

34

Conference Title

National Conference on Mitigating Air Emissions from Animal Feeding Operations

Conference Date

May 19-21, 2008

City

Des Moines, IA

Abstract

One of the most significant and persistent environmental concerns regarding swine production is odor transport from animal feeding operations and manure storage facilities. Odor constituents include ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and various volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which may exist as individual gaseous compounds or adsorbed onto particulates (Zahn et al., 1997; Trabue et al., 2006; Tyndall and Coletti, 2006). Building type, facility management, animal diet, and climate affect the amount of potential odor constituents generated at production facilities. Local environmental conditions, especially wind speed and direction, vegetative cover, and topography determine the amount of odor constituents transported downstream from production facilities. Odor mitigation strategies may be designed to reduce either odor generation or transport or both.

Comments

This proceeding is from The National Conference on Mitigating Air Emissions from Animal Feeding Operations (2008): 30.

Rights

Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Article Location

 
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