Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Conference

Agroforestry and Sustainable Systems Symposium

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

2005

Journal or Book Title

United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service General Technical Report

Issue

RM-GTR-261

First Page

13

Last Page

28

Conference Title

Agroforestry and Sustainable Systems Symposium

Conference Date

August 7-10, 1994

City

Fort Collins, Colorado

Abstract

Riparian ecosystems occupy a narrow belt of land along streams and around lakes and wetlands and are characterized by plant and animal communities that are dependent on close proximity to water. These ecotones function as buffer zones for materials moving from the uplands toward the surface water. They control stream morphology and ecology and also maintain landscape biodiversity by providing diverse habitats and corridors for animals and plants. Most of the riparian zones in the Midwestern agroecosystems and arid and semiarid western rangelands have been extensively impacted by agricultural cropping and grazing activities. These impacts have generally decreased water quality, impaired riparian and instream biodiversity, increased water quantity, and modified the timing of streamflow. Riparian zones are generally resilient because of their moist, moderate and fertile environments. With proper management, this resiliency can be sustained. Proper management should include construction or restoration of multi-species buffer strips and deferred or rotational grazing or exclusion of livestock. Several riparian zone restoration and management strategies are discussed.

Comments

This is a proceeding of the Agroforestry and Sustainable Systems Symposium, United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service General Technical Report 261 (1995): 13-28.

Rights

Works produced by the U.S. Government are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

Article Location

 
COinS