Campus Units

Political Science, Statistics

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Submitted Manuscript

Publication Date

2016

Journal or Book Title

Political Science Research and Methods

Volume

4

Issue

1

First Page

5

Last Page

26

DOI

10.1017/psrm.2015.27

Abstract

This paper expands traditional predatory theory approaches to state fiscal capacity by adopting spatial analytical reasoning and methods. While previous work in the predatory theory tradition has often incorporated interdependent external influences, such as war and trade, it has often done so in a way that maintains a theoretical and empirical autonomy of the state. Theoretically, we suggest four mechanisms (coercion, competition, learning, and emulation) that operate to channel information through interstate rivalry and territorial contiguity, trade networks, and the political space associated with regime type and intergovernmental organization membership. We test our predictions using a multi-parametric spatio-temporal autoregressive model with four spatial lags capturing the four mechanisms. Our empirical results provide support for the coercion and learning mechanisms.

Comments

This is a manuscript of an article from Political Science Research and Methods 4 (2016): 5, doi:10.1017/psrm.2015.27. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

The European Political Science Association

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Published Version

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