Campus Units

Political Science

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

Spring 1982

Journal or Book Title

Polity

Volume

14

Issue

3

First Page

531

Last Page

547

DOI

10.2307/3234540

Abstract

The analysis of international organizations and their effect on the international system have increased markedly in recent years. A number of reasons may be suggested for such renewed interest in these political institutions: growth in sheer number of these organizations; the magnitude of their use by states; their potential for addressing important international problems such as energy, food, hijackings, and international terrorism, among others; and the enlarged potential of these organizations (such as OPEC, IMF, and the World Bank) for influencing the dynamics of international politics. Despite this expanded interest in international institutions, notable gaps exist in our knowledge about the linkage between nations and international organizations. As a consequence, a need exists to offer some substantive and theoretical guidance to future research in this important area of international politics. In an exploratory way, this paper addresses such a concern. We first review some of the approaches used in evaluating international organizations in the conduct of international relations; next, we offer some research suggestions for analyzing international organizations (primarily within the context of previous efforts); and finally, we suggest how theoretical development can take place through the examination of this new research agenda.

Comments

This article is published as McCormick, James M. "Alternate Approaches to Evaluating International Organizations: Some Research Directions," Polity 14, no. 3 (Spring 1982): 531-547. DOI: 10.2307/3234540. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

Northeastern Political Science Association

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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