Campus Units

Political Science

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Published Version

Publication Date

Summer 1990

Journal or Book Title

Polity

Volume

22

Issue

4

First Page

627

Last Page

653

DOI

10.2307/3234822

Abstract

A bipartisan consensus about the means and ends of American foreign policy is generally thought to have been part of the American political environment during the Cold War era. This consensus is also commonly thought to have been a casualty of the Vietnam War, when disagreements arose about the threat of communism, the use of American troops abroad, and relations with the Soviet Union. This article uses public opinion data from the decades following World War II pertaining to these areas of assumed change to measure whether a consensus ever existed and whether it eroded in the wake of Vietnam. The authors conclude that evidence of change can be found but that it is less dramatic in some respects than might be expected.

Comments

This article is published as Wittkopf, Eugene R., and James M. McCormick. "The cold war consensus: Did it exist?" Polity 22, no. 4 (1990): 627-653. DOI: 10.2307/3234822. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

Northeastern Political Science Association

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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