Campus Units

Psychology

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Accepted Manuscript

Publication Date

2008

Journal or Book Title

Applied Developmental Science

Volume

12

Issue

4

First Page

202

Last Page

210

DOI

10.1080/10888690802388144

Abstract

This study will address the initial question: Are there ethnic differences in parenting that remain when contextual variables are controlled and are related to culture, focusing on two samples of rural African American families. This study is part of a series of coordinated studies presented in this special issue (Le et al., 2008). Specific attention was given to ascertaining whether these differences were explained by contextual factors, such as socioeconomic factors (i.e., parents' educational level, homeownership, family structure, and number of children in the household). Finally, this study examined whether any differences in parenting (warmth, monitoring, communication) were attributed to cultural factors, after controlling for the contributions of contextual factors. Results indicate that parental education, family size, negative life events, racial discrimination, neighborhood characteristics, and religiosity were significantly associated with various domains of parenting among rural African Americans.

Comments

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Applied Developmental Science (2008), available online at DOI: 10.1080/10888690802388144. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Published Version

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