Campus Units

Psychology

Document Type

Article

Publication Version

Accepted Manuscript

Publication Date

9-28-2017

Journal or Book Title

Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition

Volume

6

Issue

4

First Page

434

Last Page

441

DOI

10.1016/j.jarmac.2017.07.002

Abstract

Practicing retrieval can improve the updating or modification of existing knowledge. When students need to update their existing knowledge, performing retrieval practice on the first set of materials often strengthens learning of the next set. However, Davis and Chan (2015)reported that interpolated testing can sometimes impair new learning. Here, we examined whether frequently switching between retrieval of previously learned material and encoding of new material can disrupt learning of the new material. In the current experiment, participants either switched between restudying originally learned items and new learning or between retrieving originally learned items and new learning, and we varied the frequency with which task switching occurred. We found that interpolating retrieval, but not restudy, with new learning impaired new learning. These results are consistent with the idea that retrieval practice and encoding rely on different cognitive processes, and intermixing them can exert a cost.

Comments

This is an accepted manuscript of an article published as Davis, Sara D., Jason CK Chan, and Miko M. Wilford. "The Dark Side of Interpolated Testing: Frequent Switching Between Retrieval and Encoding Impairs New Learning." Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition 6, no. 4 (2017): 434-441. doi: 10.1016/j.jarmac.2017.07.002. Posted with permission.

Copyright Owner

Elsevier, B.V.

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Published Version

Included in

Psychology Commons

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