Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1979 12:00 AM

Description

The rapid evolution of ultrasonic testing technology over the last ten years has found industry unable to test or apply many of the new concepts resulting from this work due to limited facility resources to adopt these advanced methods. The testing of these methods is a desirable sequence in the evolution of new ideas to production usage and in many cases would require a test bed on which to try innovative ideas. This test bed concept would provide an avenue to resolve applications problems which might otherwise overshadow the significance of technology innovations. The availability of a test vehicle with which to prove or if necessary further modify these growth ideas further benefits these accomplishments by verifying their validity and performance. In recognition of this need, a program has been undertaken to establish an advanced ultrasonic work station with the ability to function as a test system for the application of these concepts to commonly encountered inspection tasks. The present system contains all solid state instrumentation designed around the latest electronic concepts and features extensive computer interfacing with regard to both signal handling as well as command and feedback systems. The specially developed ultrasonic instrumentation contains programmable gates and interface synchronization and provides the capability to process the full R-F waveform during test. Output from the ultrasonic instrument is processed through a high speed digitizer between the instrument and the computer which is dedicated primarily to data acquisition, analysis and retention. Two~way communication linkages exist between the ultrasonic instrument and the computer as well as between the computer and the motion and position control to allow the incorporation of signal correction techniques to accommodate material attenuation, surface lens effects due to radii, etc., so that the computer can judge signal significance incorporating these corrections. Data output from the test is supplemented by graphic displays allowing the presentation of planar and rotated views with the expansion capability for the examination of selected volumes. This system is currently being applied to the evaluation of specially contoured shapes for advanced turbine engine programs in which signal characterization will play a significant part in the data analysis.

Book Title

Proceedings of the ARPA/AFML Review of Progress in Quantitative NDE

Chapter

3. Reduction to Practice Test Beds

Pages

17-22

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Test Bed Concept as a Means of Introducing New Technology

La Jolla, CA

The rapid evolution of ultrasonic testing technology over the last ten years has found industry unable to test or apply many of the new concepts resulting from this work due to limited facility resources to adopt these advanced methods. The testing of these methods is a desirable sequence in the evolution of new ideas to production usage and in many cases would require a test bed on which to try innovative ideas. This test bed concept would provide an avenue to resolve applications problems which might otherwise overshadow the significance of technology innovations. The availability of a test vehicle with which to prove or if necessary further modify these growth ideas further benefits these accomplishments by verifying their validity and performance. In recognition of this need, a program has been undertaken to establish an advanced ultrasonic work station with the ability to function as a test system for the application of these concepts to commonly encountered inspection tasks. The present system contains all solid state instrumentation designed around the latest electronic concepts and features extensive computer interfacing with regard to both signal handling as well as command and feedback systems. The specially developed ultrasonic instrumentation contains programmable gates and interface synchronization and provides the capability to process the full R-F waveform during test. Output from the ultrasonic instrument is processed through a high speed digitizer between the instrument and the computer which is dedicated primarily to data acquisition, analysis and retention. Two~way communication linkages exist between the ultrasonic instrument and the computer as well as between the computer and the motion and position control to allow the incorporation of signal correction techniques to accommodate material attenuation, surface lens effects due to radii, etc., so that the computer can judge signal significance incorporating these corrections. Data output from the test is supplemented by graphic displays allowing the presentation of planar and rotated views with the expansion capability for the examination of selected volumes. This system is currently being applied to the evaluation of specially contoured shapes for advanced turbine engine programs in which signal characterization will play a significant part in the data analysis.