Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1983 12:00 AM

Description

It is well known that when a finite ultrasonic beam of a given spatial distribution is incident at the Rayleigh angle to a liquid-solid interface, the spatial distribution of the reflected field may be altered significantly. The “energy redistribution” is due to the interference between the specularly reflected beam and a surface wave which has leaked back to the water. The “shape” of the reflected field depends on the so-called Schoch displacement (which is characteristic of the interface) and on the width of the ultrasonic beam. It has also been observed that significant energy is scattered back to the transmitter at the Rayleigh angle. Experimental results will be presented on the evaluation of the parameters effecting the back-scattered amplitude. The backscattered Rayleigh angle phenomena are also applied to measured surface wave velocities of anisotropic materials such as casts and welds.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

2B

Chapter

Section 14: General Ultrasonics

Pages

883-895

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-3706-5_56

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Backscattering of Ultrasonic Leaky Waves from Liquid-Solid Interfaces

La Jolla, CA

It is well known that when a finite ultrasonic beam of a given spatial distribution is incident at the Rayleigh angle to a liquid-solid interface, the spatial distribution of the reflected field may be altered significantly. The “energy redistribution” is due to the interference between the specularly reflected beam and a surface wave which has leaked back to the water. The “shape” of the reflected field depends on the so-called Schoch displacement (which is characteristic of the interface) and on the width of the ultrasonic beam. It has also been observed that significant energy is scattered back to the transmitter at the Rayleigh angle. Experimental results will be presented on the evaluation of the parameters effecting the back-scattered amplitude. The backscattered Rayleigh angle phenomena are also applied to measured surface wave velocities of anisotropic materials such as casts and welds.