Location

San Diego, CA

Start Date

1-1-1985 12:00 AM

Description

It has been shown both experimentally and theoretically1 that ultrasonic waves propagate circumferentially around the surface of cavities in an elastic medium, besides being reflected from its “flash points”. Surface wave returns were seen to decisively influence the time structure of the echo return from incident ultrasonic pulses. Nagase2 has solved a characteristic equation applicable to the spherical cavity problem, from which it could be shown3 that the surface of a spherical cavity supports a Rayleigh-type and two (P and S) Franz-type surface waves, of known speeds and dispersions. On the other hand, the complex eigenfrequencies of cavities were recently obtained numerically4. We have used these numerical results in order to satisfy Nagase’s solutions, presented in the form of propagation constants of the surface waves as series of fractional powers of the frequency, and have obtained in this way a mode number assignment for all the complex eigenfrequencies. Using this, we calculate dispersion curves for the Rayleigh, P and S- type surface wave phase velocities; their knowledge will permit an accurate interpretation of ultrasonic scattering experiments1, which previously could be analyzed in a qualitative way only.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

4A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Ultrasonics

Section

Scattering

Pages

161-165

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-9421-5_18

Language

en

File Format

Application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Surface Wave Modes on Spherical Cavities Excited by Incident Ultrasound

San Diego, CA

It has been shown both experimentally and theoretically1 that ultrasonic waves propagate circumferentially around the surface of cavities in an elastic medium, besides being reflected from its “flash points”. Surface wave returns were seen to decisively influence the time structure of the echo return from incident ultrasonic pulses. Nagase2 has solved a characteristic equation applicable to the spherical cavity problem, from which it could be shown3 that the surface of a spherical cavity supports a Rayleigh-type and two (P and S) Franz-type surface waves, of known speeds and dispersions. On the other hand, the complex eigenfrequencies of cavities were recently obtained numerically4. We have used these numerical results in order to satisfy Nagase’s solutions, presented in the form of propagation constants of the surface waves as series of fractional powers of the frequency, and have obtained in this way a mode number assignment for all the complex eigenfrequencies. Using this, we calculate dispersion curves for the Rayleigh, P and S- type surface wave phase velocities; their knowledge will permit an accurate interpretation of ultrasonic scattering experiments1, which previously could be analyzed in a qualitative way only.