Location

San Diego, CA

Start Date

1-1-1985 12:00 AM

Description

It is now well accepted that the partial contact of fracture surfaces can have significant effects on the ultrasonic response of fatigue cracks. The authors and colleagues1–4 have developed an approximate model for this effect in which the array of contacts is replaced by an equivalent distributed spring with stiffness per unit area, K. A result of this model, the frequency dependent transmission and reflection coefficients, has been verified by comparison to exact solutions for special cases.5,6 Of particular note is the comparison to the transmission and reflection at a periodic array of strip contacts, as analyzed by Angel and Achenbach7, which is in good agreement with that of the spring model when the wavelength is large with respect to the contact spacing. Comparison to static elasticity solutions allows K to be determined for a variety of interesting interfacial topographies.5,6

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

4A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Ultrasonics

Section

Scattering

Pages

61-71

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-9421-5_8

Language

en

File Format

Application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Interaction of Ultrasonic Waves with Simulated and Real Fatigue Cracks

San Diego, CA

It is now well accepted that the partial contact of fracture surfaces can have significant effects on the ultrasonic response of fatigue cracks. The authors and colleagues1–4 have developed an approximate model for this effect in which the array of contacts is replaced by an equivalent distributed spring with stiffness per unit area, K. A result of this model, the frequency dependent transmission and reflection coefficients, has been verified by comparison to exact solutions for special cases.5,6 Of particular note is the comparison to the transmission and reflection at a periodic array of strip contacts, as analyzed by Angel and Achenbach7, which is in good agreement with that of the spring model when the wavelength is large with respect to the contact spacing. Comparison to static elasticity solutions allows K to be determined for a variety of interesting interfacial topographies.5,6