Location

Williamsburg, VA

Start Date

1-1-1986 12:00 AM

Description

Ceramic materials can replace metals in many applications requiring high strength and resistance to environmental factors. This can be accomplished only when the ceramic components are sufficiently reliable in service. Modern proof testing methods although capable of separating good components from defective ones, up to the limit of the test, cannot assure that all potentially destructive defects have been found. Long term creep effects and growth of defects due to stress can lead ultimately to failure of a component. Therefore, it is necessary to develop nondestructive testing techniques which can be used in a quality control environment or even at the site of the component. Several techniques are available based on metals evaluation; however, the size of the defects which must be detected in ceramics are in the order of 10 um so these techniques require development to both detect and characterise defects in ceramics.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

5A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Conventional Methodologies

Section

Ultrasonics

Pages

101-107

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-7763-8_10

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Ultrasonic Detection and Characterization of Microspherical Defects in Model Ceramics

Williamsburg, VA

Ceramic materials can replace metals in many applications requiring high strength and resistance to environmental factors. This can be accomplished only when the ceramic components are sufficiently reliable in service. Modern proof testing methods although capable of separating good components from defective ones, up to the limit of the test, cannot assure that all potentially destructive defects have been found. Long term creep effects and growth of defects due to stress can lead ultimately to failure of a component. Therefore, it is necessary to develop nondestructive testing techniques which can be used in a quality control environment or even at the site of the component. Several techniques are available based on metals evaluation; however, the size of the defects which must be detected in ceramics are in the order of 10 um so these techniques require development to both detect and characterise defects in ceramics.