Location

Williamsburg, VA

Start Date

1-1-1986 12:00 AM

Description

Examination of the backscattering of ultrasonic waves has been suggested as a possible technique for the non-destructive evaluation of materials because it involves a simple measurement requiring access to a single surface only and because the conversion of normally incident, longitudinal waves to shear waves is minimal at a scattering angle of 180°. While the measurement is simple to carry out, the return signal may be quite complicated, especially for polycrystalline or composite materials. These materials possess local inhomogeneities of differing sizes,orientation and elastic properties from which a plane wave may scatter, often more than once, and then the scattered waves from one or more sources may interfere among themselves. These difficulties are often compounded by coupling among the several modes of propagation associated with inhomogeneity and lead to a dispersion of the incident wave. Thus the backscattered signal represents the complex, three-dimensional, phase sensetive scattering from a material that mat not be well characterized. While there has been substantial effort and much progress in developing techniques for the reconstruction of characteristics of the medium from the scattering of an acoustic wave an accurate prediction of the scattering from inhomogeneous and anisotropic medium, such as a composite material, remains a difficult problem. Generally speaking, our lack of a detailed knowledge of the structure of the medium over distances large enough to support a significant dispersal of the wave makes the development of a reliable model of the medium a formidible task.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

5A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Conventional Methodologies

Section

Ultrasonics

Pages

109-115

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-7763-8_11

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Backscattering of Acoustic Signals from Inhomogenuities in Solids

Williamsburg, VA

Examination of the backscattering of ultrasonic waves has been suggested as a possible technique for the non-destructive evaluation of materials because it involves a simple measurement requiring access to a single surface only and because the conversion of normally incident, longitudinal waves to shear waves is minimal at a scattering angle of 180°. While the measurement is simple to carry out, the return signal may be quite complicated, especially for polycrystalline or composite materials. These materials possess local inhomogeneities of differing sizes,orientation and elastic properties from which a plane wave may scatter, often more than once, and then the scattered waves from one or more sources may interfere among themselves. These difficulties are often compounded by coupling among the several modes of propagation associated with inhomogeneity and lead to a dispersion of the incident wave. Thus the backscattered signal represents the complex, three-dimensional, phase sensetive scattering from a material that mat not be well characterized. While there has been substantial effort and much progress in developing techniques for the reconstruction of characteristics of the medium from the scattering of an acoustic wave an accurate prediction of the scattering from inhomogeneous and anisotropic medium, such as a composite material, remains a difficult problem. Generally speaking, our lack of a detailed knowledge of the structure of the medium over distances large enough to support a significant dispersal of the wave makes the development of a reliable model of the medium a formidible task.