Location

Williamsburg, VA

Start Date

1-1-1986 12:00 AM

Description

In 1984 the concept of the flaw profile (a plot of the magnitude and phase of ΔZ along the length of the flaw) was introduced as a tool for inverting eddy current measurements taken on surface breaking flaws interrogated with a spatially nonuniform probe field [1,2], Comparison of direct measurements of approximately rectangular EDM notches with theoretical calculations for rectangular flaws showed satisfactory agreement. Inversion procedures developed for sizing a flaw from its flaw profile data were also found to give reasonable results. During the past year the goal has been to develop a probe-flaw interaction theory for semi-elliptical flaws in a nonuniform interrogating field. This is again a collaborative effort between Stanford and the National Bureau of Standards at Boulder. The theory, and some comparison with experiment, is given in this paper and details of the experiments are described in a companion paper [3].

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

5A

Chapter

Chapter 2: Inversion, Imaging and Reconstruction

Section

Inversion

Pages

383-393

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-7763-8_39

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Semi-Elliptical Surface Flaw EC Interaction and Inversion: Theory

Williamsburg, VA

In 1984 the concept of the flaw profile (a plot of the magnitude and phase of ΔZ along the length of the flaw) was introduced as a tool for inverting eddy current measurements taken on surface breaking flaws interrogated with a spatially nonuniform probe field [1,2], Comparison of direct measurements of approximately rectangular EDM notches with theoretical calculations for rectangular flaws showed satisfactory agreement. Inversion procedures developed for sizing a flaw from its flaw profile data were also found to give reasonable results. During the past year the goal has been to develop a probe-flaw interaction theory for semi-elliptical flaws in a nonuniform interrogating field. This is again a collaborative effort between Stanford and the National Bureau of Standards at Boulder. The theory, and some comparison with experiment, is given in this paper and details of the experiments are described in a companion paper [3].