Location

Williamsburg, VA

Start Date

1-1-1986 12:00 AM

Description

Imaging methods based on specimen excitation by scanned laser and electron beams are now well established as nondestructive methods of characterizing materials properties and locating surface and near subsurface flaws in solids. Several classes of methods have been identified each distinguished by the method of generation or the means of detection. Examples include Optical Beam Deflection (OBD) imaging [1,2]. Scanned Photoacoustic imaging [3] and a variety of scanned laser and electron beam acoustic imaging techniques [4,5,6] which use attached piezoelectric transducers to monitor stress generated within the specimen. Because many of these methods monitor changes in specimen temperature or a parameter related to specimen temperature, these imaging methods have been broadly termed thermal wave imaging (TWI). Nonthermal image contrast mechanisms may exist in cases where specific beam-specimen interactions are present. The term TWI is therefore a convenient but inaccurate way of categorizing scanned image methods using modulated beams.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

5A

Chapter

Chapter 2: Inversion, Imaging and Reconstruction

Section

Imaging and Reconstruction

Pages

455-463

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-7763-8_47

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Ion-Acoustic Imaging of Surface Flaws in Aluminum

Williamsburg, VA

Imaging methods based on specimen excitation by scanned laser and electron beams are now well established as nondestructive methods of characterizing materials properties and locating surface and near subsurface flaws in solids. Several classes of methods have been identified each distinguished by the method of generation or the means of detection. Examples include Optical Beam Deflection (OBD) imaging [1,2]. Scanned Photoacoustic imaging [3] and a variety of scanned laser and electron beam acoustic imaging techniques [4,5,6] which use attached piezoelectric transducers to monitor stress generated within the specimen. Because many of these methods monitor changes in specimen temperature or a parameter related to specimen temperature, these imaging methods have been broadly termed thermal wave imaging (TWI). Nonthermal image contrast mechanisms may exist in cases where specific beam-specimen interactions are present. The term TWI is therefore a convenient but inaccurate way of categorizing scanned image methods using modulated beams.