Location

Williamsburg, VA

Start Date

1-1-1986 12:00 AM

Description

The synthetic aperture focussing techniques are known to be a powerful tool in analyzing defects. Instead of the two dimensional SAFT which is developed in [1], a simpler version has been realized where a manipulator moves a probe or a couple of probes along one line only. Therefore the processed image is a B-scan image beneath that scanned line pointing in the insonification direction. First experiments have been made during an exchange program NRC-BMFT [2] at the end of 1980 at Southwest-Research-Institute at San Antonio, Texas. Based upon that work a new system has been developed at IzfP called HOLOSAFT [3], where the LSAFT part plays an important role in the evaluation of depth extension, flaw inclination and positioning. During the past years more than 5000 LSAFT scans have been recorded and evaluated using either pulse echo technique or tandem, longitudinal waves or shear waves. In the following the new data acquisition and evaluation system will be explained in detail and the practical experience with the LSAFT imaging system will be reported.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

5A

Chapter

Chapter 2: Inversion, Imaging and Reconstruction

Section

Imaging and Reconstruction

Pages

493-500

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-7763-8_51

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Practical Experiences with LSAFT

Williamsburg, VA

The synthetic aperture focussing techniques are known to be a powerful tool in analyzing defects. Instead of the two dimensional SAFT which is developed in [1], a simpler version has been realized where a manipulator moves a probe or a couple of probes along one line only. Therefore the processed image is a B-scan image beneath that scanned line pointing in the insonification direction. First experiments have been made during an exchange program NRC-BMFT [2] at the end of 1980 at Southwest-Research-Institute at San Antonio, Texas. Based upon that work a new system has been developed at IzfP called HOLOSAFT [3], where the LSAFT part plays an important role in the evaluation of depth extension, flaw inclination and positioning. During the past years more than 5000 LSAFT scans have been recorded and evaluated using either pulse echo technique or tandem, longitudinal waves or shear waves. In the following the new data acquisition and evaluation system will be explained in detail and the practical experience with the LSAFT imaging system will be reported.