Presenter Information

D. M. Tow, EG&G Idaho, Inc.

Location

Williamsburg, VA

Start Date

1-1-1986 12:00 AM

Description

The crack reconstruction method presented here employs a ray-tracing field code described in another session of this conference [1]. This field code calculates the transducer response to a crack of known geometry by modeling it as a collection of point scattering elements. The model is linear in that the transducer response to a collection of point scattering elements is equal to the sum of the transducer responses of the individual elements. The field code is currently only capable of modeling two-dimensional geometries. In two dimensions a crack is modeled as a linear array of scattering elements. A transducer is similarly modeled as a linear array of point sources. All results discussed in this paper are two-dimensional simulated results; Figure 1 depicts a typical 2-D inspection geometry.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

5A

Chapter

Chapter 2: Inversion, Imaging and Reconstruction

Section

Imaging and Reconstruction

Pages

521-527

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-7763-8_54

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Reconstruction of the Geometry of a Surface-Breaking Crack

Williamsburg, VA

The crack reconstruction method presented here employs a ray-tracing field code described in another session of this conference [1]. This field code calculates the transducer response to a crack of known geometry by modeling it as a collection of point scattering elements. The model is linear in that the transducer response to a collection of point scattering elements is equal to the sum of the transducer responses of the individual elements. The field code is currently only capable of modeling two-dimensional geometries. In two dimensions a crack is modeled as a linear array of scattering elements. A transducer is similarly modeled as a linear array of point sources. All results discussed in this paper are two-dimensional simulated results; Figure 1 depicts a typical 2-D inspection geometry.