Location

Williamsburg, VA

Start Date

1-1-1986 12:00 AM

Description

We will discuss preliminary results on the use of a low-energy laser and a sensitive laser interferometer for noncontact material testing of metals and nonmetals. There have been numerous reports [1–12] on the use of lasers to generate acoustic signals, but this is the first use of a relatively low-energy tunable laser source and improved interferometer to measure acoustic waveforms in both metals and nonmetals [13]. The use of a laser interferometer for the noncontact detection of acoustic pulses has also been reported previously [14–20], but we now report the use of a sensitive “non-Michelson” interferometer with increased signal-to-noise capabilities. The combination of these features allows noncontact, low-energy optical generation and optical detection in a variety of materials, in potentially hostile environments, and provides accurate accoustic waveforms which can be used to characterize specimens. These results, therefore, begin to demonstrate the feasibility of a portable (entirely) optical system for the nondestructive evaluation of materials.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

5A

Chapter

Chapter 3: Sensors and Signal Processing

Section

Sensors

Pages

659-667

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-7763-8_68

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Noncontact Material Testing Using Low-Energy Optical Generation and Detection of Acoustic Pulses

Williamsburg, VA

We will discuss preliminary results on the use of a low-energy laser and a sensitive laser interferometer for noncontact material testing of metals and nonmetals. There have been numerous reports [1–12] on the use of lasers to generate acoustic signals, but this is the first use of a relatively low-energy tunable laser source and improved interferometer to measure acoustic waveforms in both metals and nonmetals [13]. The use of a laser interferometer for the noncontact detection of acoustic pulses has also been reported previously [14–20], but we now report the use of a sensitive “non-Michelson” interferometer with increased signal-to-noise capabilities. The combination of these features allows noncontact, low-energy optical generation and optical detection in a variety of materials, in potentially hostile environments, and provides accurate accoustic waveforms which can be used to characterize specimens. These results, therefore, begin to demonstrate the feasibility of a portable (entirely) optical system for the nondestructive evaluation of materials.