Location

Williamsburg, VA

Start Date

1-1-1986 12:00 AM

Description

The development of the Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (or SQUID) as the most sensitive device known for thie measurement of changes in magnetic flux has presented new opportunities for the fields of geophysics [1] and biomagnetism [2]. In this paper we report on the use of SQUID instrumentation for nondestructive evaluation of electrically conducting and ferromagnetic specimens [3]. Specifically, we report preliminary experiments on the use of SQUIDs for the detection of defects (such as cracks, holes, weld seams, variations in wall thickness, etc.) in the walls of a hollow pipe, and for monitoring the magnetic state of a ferromagnetic sample under stress-strain loading conditions.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

5A

Chapter

Chapter 3: Sensors and Signal Processing

Section

Sensors

Pages

699-704

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-7763-8_72

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Defect Detection with a Squid Magnetometer

Williamsburg, VA

The development of the Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (or SQUID) as the most sensitive device known for thie measurement of changes in magnetic flux has presented new opportunities for the fields of geophysics [1] and biomagnetism [2]. In this paper we report on the use of SQUID instrumentation for nondestructive evaluation of electrically conducting and ferromagnetic specimens [3]. Specifically, we report preliminary experiments on the use of SQUIDs for the detection of defects (such as cracks, holes, weld seams, variations in wall thickness, etc.) in the walls of a hollow pipe, and for monitoring the magnetic state of a ferromagnetic sample under stress-strain loading conditions.