Location

Williamsburg, VA

Start Date

1-1-1986 12:00 AM

Description

Over the last few years, NDE ultrasonic research has progressed along several separate and independent lines, including defect scattering models and transducer characterization. Now some workers [1] are attempting to account for transducer characteristics in the defect scattering models. This paper describes an approach which has the potential to combine numerical calculations of realistic transducer fields with defect scattering theories. We are able to calculate the fields in homogeneous, isotropic solids due to a transducer coupled to the solid by water. In addition we have introduced two simple crack interaction models and calculated the transducer response to the crack. The technique [2] uses ray tracing to find the field of the transducer. To make the ray tracing technique useful we have extended it to three dimensions and allowed for oblique incidence. In addition we have provided for the correct vector nature of the field in the solid.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

5A

Chapter

Chapter 1: Conventional Methodologies

Section

Ultrasonics

Pages

83-91

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-7763-8_8

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Numerical Calculations of Ultrasonic Field/Crack Interactions

Williamsburg, VA

Over the last few years, NDE ultrasonic research has progressed along several separate and independent lines, including defect scattering models and transducer characterization. Now some workers [1] are attempting to account for transducer characteristics in the defect scattering models. This paper describes an approach which has the potential to combine numerical calculations of realistic transducer fields with defect scattering theories. We are able to calculate the fields in homogeneous, isotropic solids due to a transducer coupled to the solid by water. In addition we have introduced two simple crack interaction models and calculated the transducer response to the crack. The technique [2] uses ray tracing to find the field of the transducer. To make the ray tracing technique useful we have extended it to three dimensions and allowed for oblique incidence. In addition we have provided for the correct vector nature of the field in the solid.