Location

Williamsburg, VA

Start Date

1-1-1986 12:00 AM

Description

An automated, computer controlled inspection system is being developed under the Retirement for Cause (RFC) Program. This inspection system is responsible for the reliable detection of flaws of critical sizes in an assortment of locations and orientations on multiple disks and spacers in the fan, compressor and turbine sections of the F100 aircraft engine. As a result the eddy current inspection modules in the RFC system must incorporate a wide variety of eddy current probes capable of completely inspecting the many required geometries. During the course of development of such a system, tests must be conducted to insure total coverage of the required areas; these tests result in possible redesign of the probes. In addition, tests must be conducted to determine the capability of the inspection system to detect flaws. These tests result in possible adjustments to inspection parameters such as inspection frequency, filter settings, and possible modifications to inspection algorithms. When confronted with similar probes with different coil designs, it is desirable to determine the optimum design of the probe and coil using comparison tests.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

5A

Chapter

Chapter 4: Systems and Reliability

Section

Systems

Pages

893-900

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4615-7763-8_96

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

RFC Eddy Current Probe Tests

Williamsburg, VA

An automated, computer controlled inspection system is being developed under the Retirement for Cause (RFC) Program. This inspection system is responsible for the reliable detection of flaws of critical sizes in an assortment of locations and orientations on multiple disks and spacers in the fan, compressor and turbine sections of the F100 aircraft engine. As a result the eddy current inspection modules in the RFC system must incorporate a wide variety of eddy current probes capable of completely inspecting the many required geometries. During the course of development of such a system, tests must be conducted to insure total coverage of the required areas; these tests result in possible redesign of the probes. In addition, tests must be conducted to determine the capability of the inspection system to detect flaws. These tests result in possible adjustments to inspection parameters such as inspection frequency, filter settings, and possible modifications to inspection algorithms. When confronted with similar probes with different coil designs, it is desirable to determine the optimum design of the probe and coil using comparison tests.