Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1987 12:00 AM

Description

Fiber sensors have specifically been applied to the quantitative nondestructive characterization of materials for several years [1–3]. Due to the inherent similarity of unjacketed glass-on-glass optical fibers and individual graphite fibers in graphite/epoxy composites in particular, a number of investigators have considered the use of optical fibers as sensors which may be imbedded directly within composite laminae. The effects of temperature and strain integrated along the length of the sensor fiber in a composite specimen can be determined using a variety of simple methods. Spatial resolution of such quantities along the imbedded fiber in length may be obtained using several more complicated distributed fiber sensing techniques. Strain tensor quantities may be determined by both presuming accurate models of the applied stress and knowing the photoelastic and mechanical properties of the imbedded fiber.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

6B

Chapter

Chapter 6: Advanced Composites

Section

Defects

Pages

1241-1245

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-1893-4_141

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Imbedded Optical Fiber Sensor of Differential Strain in Composites

La Jolla, CA

Fiber sensors have specifically been applied to the quantitative nondestructive characterization of materials for several years [1–3]. Due to the inherent similarity of unjacketed glass-on-glass optical fibers and individual graphite fibers in graphite/epoxy composites in particular, a number of investigators have considered the use of optical fibers as sensors which may be imbedded directly within composite laminae. The effects of temperature and strain integrated along the length of the sensor fiber in a composite specimen can be determined using a variety of simple methods. Spatial resolution of such quantities along the imbedded fiber in length may be obtained using several more complicated distributed fiber sensing techniques. Strain tensor quantities may be determined by both presuming accurate models of the applied stress and knowing the photoelastic and mechanical properties of the imbedded fiber.