Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1987 12:00 AM

Description

The application of optical pump-probe techniques to the study of semiconductor transport properties has been considered recently by several authors [1–4]. Absorption of the pump radiation generates an electron-hole plasma, which thermalizes with the lattice within a few picoseconds [5]. Subsequent plasma diffusion and pair recombination cause additional, distributed heating on a longer time scale. An optical probe may be used to detect the thermoelastic deformation of the surface [1], the variation of the index of refraction within the sample [2], or the change of surface reflectance [3,4], the latter two effects arising from the dependence of the index of refraction on both temperature and carrier-density variation. The signal dependence on transport properties is determined by modeling the coupled thermal/plasma generation/diffusion processes. One-dimensional theoretical analyses have been used, and these are adequate when (approximately) uniform illumination of the sample leads to thermal and carrier diffusion which is essentially one-dimensional, or when, as in photoacoustic cell detection [6,7], the detection process effectively executes a spatial average [8].

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

6B

Chapter

Chapter 7: Electronic Materials and Devices

Section

Electronic Materials and Devices

Pages

1361-1368

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-1893-4_154

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Measurement of Semiconductor Transport Properties Using Scanned Modulated Reflectance

La Jolla, CA

The application of optical pump-probe techniques to the study of semiconductor transport properties has been considered recently by several authors [1–4]. Absorption of the pump radiation generates an electron-hole plasma, which thermalizes with the lattice within a few picoseconds [5]. Subsequent plasma diffusion and pair recombination cause additional, distributed heating on a longer time scale. An optical probe may be used to detect the thermoelastic deformation of the surface [1], the variation of the index of refraction within the sample [2], or the change of surface reflectance [3,4], the latter two effects arising from the dependence of the index of refraction on both temperature and carrier-density variation. The signal dependence on transport properties is determined by modeling the coupled thermal/plasma generation/diffusion processes. One-dimensional theoretical analyses have been used, and these are adequate when (approximately) uniform illumination of the sample leads to thermal and carrier diffusion which is essentially one-dimensional, or when, as in photoacoustic cell detection [6,7], the detection process effectively executes a spatial average [8].