Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1987 12:00 AM

Description

The three basic components needed to truly automate a welding machine are being investigated in a joint research effort involving the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). These are: sensors to detect the physical properties of the weld, a model of the welding process, and a control system that can take signals from the sensors, for use in the feedback control, to the welder. Research programs at the INEL are developing electro-optic and ultrasonic sensors to detect the physical properties of the weld [1] and a model [2] of the welding process to relate these properties to parameters in the control model being developed at MIT. This paper discusses the ultrasonic sensing techniques which detect weld bead geometry on root passes during the gas metal arc (GMA) welding process and the approach for acquiring and evaluating the ultrasonic signal and assessing its quality for use as an input signal to a closed loop controlled welding system.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

6B

Chapter

Chapter 8: Materials Characterization

Section

Weldments and Bonds

Pages

1723-1730

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-1893-4_195

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

Share

COinS
 
Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

Ultrasonic Detection of Weld Bead Geometry

La Jolla, CA

The three basic components needed to truly automate a welding machine are being investigated in a joint research effort involving the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). These are: sensors to detect the physical properties of the weld, a model of the welding process, and a control system that can take signals from the sensors, for use in the feedback control, to the welder. Research programs at the INEL are developing electro-optic and ultrasonic sensors to detect the physical properties of the weld [1] and a model [2] of the welding process to relate these properties to parameters in the control model being developed at MIT. This paper discusses the ultrasonic sensing techniques which detect weld bead geometry on root passes during the gas metal arc (GMA) welding process and the approach for acquiring and evaluating the ultrasonic signal and assessing its quality for use as an input signal to a closed loop controlled welding system.