Presenter Information

Andrew Temple, Harwell Laboratory

Location

La Jolla, CA

Start Date

1-1-1987 12:00 AM

Description

Non-destructive inspection is widely used to ensure that engineering structures such as railway rails, bridges, nuclear reactor pressure vessels, offshore oil platforms, airplane airframes and so on contain no unacceptably large defects. Such defects, if they were present in the structures, could cause failure under certain applied loads. Generally, the most serious defects are cracks which occur during manufacture, either in castings or in welds, or during service due to cyclic loads and environmental attack. The non-destructive inspections are carefully designed to be capable of detecting these crack-like defects. I am concerned here only with ultrasonic inspection techniques and consider the recent developments which have taken place in modeling them. Some of the modeling work has been driven by requirements of inspection of pressurized water reactors, some by inspection requirements foreseen for fast reactors. All the developments have application to some aspects of inspection of all reactor types: fast reactors, pressurized water reactors and gas cooled reactors; and indeed to the inspection of many other engineered structures too.

Book Title

Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation

Volume

6A

Chapter

Chapter 1: General Techniques—Fundamentals

Section

Ultrasonics

Pages

21-35

DOI

10.1007/978-1-4613-1893-4_2

Language

en

File Format

application/pdf

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Jan 1st, 12:00 AM

UK Developments in Theoretical Modeling for NDT

La Jolla, CA

Non-destructive inspection is widely used to ensure that engineering structures such as railway rails, bridges, nuclear reactor pressure vessels, offshore oil platforms, airplane airframes and so on contain no unacceptably large defects. Such defects, if they were present in the structures, could cause failure under certain applied loads. Generally, the most serious defects are cracks which occur during manufacture, either in castings or in welds, or during service due to cyclic loads and environmental attack. The non-destructive inspections are carefully designed to be capable of detecting these crack-like defects. I am concerned here only with ultrasonic inspection techniques and consider the recent developments which have taken place in modeling them. Some of the modeling work has been driven by requirements of inspection of pressurized water reactors, some by inspection requirements foreseen for fast reactors. All the developments have application to some aspects of inspection of all reactor types: fast reactors, pressurized water reactors and gas cooled reactors; and indeed to the inspection of many other engineered structures too.